Category Archives: Courses

Short Course and BA Fashion tutor Esme Young judges on the Great British Sewing Bee!

Central Saint Martins Short Course tutor Esme Young is back on our screens tonight as judge in The Great British Sewing Bee.

Esme will be teaching our Swimwear and Lingerie Workshop this summer, as well as our highly regarded Innovative Pattern Cutting for Graduates and Professional Course that starts in July.

Catch Esme on your screens at 9pm tonight on BBC2!

INSIDE LOOK: Millinery Workshop

Judy Bentinck is a London based couture milliner with an international client base and is one of the tutors on our Millinery Workshop.  We chat to Judy about her course, advice for breaking into the millinery world and Royal Ascot!

Who is your workshop targeted at and what should students expect to leave with by the end of their course?

The millinery workshop is aimed at beginners in hat making or those with some previous experience. It caters for students who are interested in millinery as a hobby, making for themselves and friends and family and also for people who intend to make it a career. All students will leave with at least 2 finished hats, usually more, but it depends on how fast they work. They will leave with the skills to continue making more hats and will know where to shop for appropriate materials. I recommend they buy my book Designing and Making Hats and Headpieces if they haven’t already got it. I also give lots of information on follow up courses.

How did you become a couture milliner and what is your advice for anyone wanting a career in millinery?

I was originally a textile designer and then a costume designer. I later trained with Rose Cory, the Queen Mother’s milliner and Royal warrant holder, in traditional couture milliner methods. Since I started in 2000, millinery has becoming increasingly popular as a career move, so my advice is, train well, develop your own style and have some really good photographs.

Royal Ascot is the millinery equivalent to the international shows. A parade of all the best and most elaborate creations around. Where do you get your inspiration for your Ascot designs and what advice would you give for choosing a hat for the races?

If I’m creating a bespoke piece for a client they will definitely want a standout piece but it has to match the outfit and suit them first and foremost. I have great fun suggesting and encouraging the client to wear a hat more outré than they normally would.

For my own designs the inspiration is all around! Nature , architecture, mathematics, films, history and more.  When I settle to design, a new themed collection, an image or an idea or colour can influence the direction, and off I go!

I have also made hats for promotional purposes, for example, creations such as an ice cream, a jug of Pimm’s, a milk carton!

Judy’s next Millinery Workshop’s are in July and August, with further dates throughout the year.  For further information please head to the Short Course website.

GUEST BLOG: Alison Branagan on the Routes to Business Success

Alison Branagan is an author and visual arts consultant and also teaches business, entrepreneurship and self-promotion courses for Creatives at Central Saint Martins Short Courses. Students who have attended Alison’s courses have gone on to set up innovative, experimental and commercial companies. We therefore asked Alison to give us more insight to the different routes of  business success for Creatives ahead of her new courses starting this summer.

If you are looking for a way to launch your art, craft practice, or design business than look no further. This summer there are a number of popular business, entrepreneurship and self-promotion Summer School courses which I run at the Central Saint Martins Kings Cross Campus in Granary Square, which are also available online.

Students who have attended these courses in the past have gone on to set up innovative, experimental and commercial companies. Each course has a number of guest speakers, including one of the team from Silverman Sherliker LLP a top London Intellectual Property firm.

Entrepreneurship For Creatives

In Business Start-up for a Creatives, we look at how to get started, covering a wide gamut of  vital areas such as costing and pricing, what to charge, business planning, legal issues, networks, marketing, trends, as well as, finance, how to get paid and understanding tax. Audrey Whelan attended this course a couple of years ago and she has now established a successful Interior Design Business. She is now a guest speaker on my courses. She works with residential clients in London, from small flats to large homes, and she says ‘Alison’s course was a great way to begin my journey into the world of running my own interior design business. Alison was not shy about the reality of the focus and commitment I would need to put in to make it work. But her approach and attention to detail resulted in an inspiring and very informative Launchpad.’

Audrey Whelan Interior Design Consultancy Photo Credit Tony Timmington © 2015
Audrey Whelan Interior Design Consultancy
Photo Credit Tony Timmington © 2015

In Entrepreneurship for Creatives we explore more practical aspects of being a creative entrepreneur, such as vision, confidence, attracting attention, negotiation, presentation, how to pitch as well as developing focused networking strategies. Rob Dakin is also a former student and he now runs his own successful children’s games business Clockwork Soldier. He is also a guest speaker on my courses.  His creative products are stocked in over 500 stores in ten countries and he says ‘I truly believe the course was a really good and useful stepping stone to launching my creative business’.

Clockwork Solder Rob Dakin’s Children’s Games Business
Clockwork Solder Rob Dakin’s Children’s Games Business

In Self-Promotion for Creatives we cover many different aspects of self-promotion, these include self-promotion, social media, networking, publicity stunts, writing marketing and more serious statements. We also cover important issues such as protecting your brand, as well as presentation, confidence, and how to sell. Alana Biviano attended my course in 2014 and has established a highly successful graphic design business, BVN Creative and she says, ‘The Self-Promotion for Creatives course was a pivotal point in my career. It covers everything a freelancer needs to know in order to market themselves and turn their skills and passion into a successful business.

BVN Creative, Alana Biviano’s Graphic Design Company
BVN Creative, Alana Biviano’s Graphic Design Company

Alana also attended my online Entrepreneurship for Creatives course even though she is based in Melbourne, Australia. My Business Start-up for Creatives (online) and Self-Promotion for Creatives (online) courses are  available to enrol on this summer, students have attended these courses from Brazil, America, France, Spain, Sweden, Russia, China, Japan and as well as the UK.

Want to take an online course in Business Start Up for Creatives? The next one starts in June and Self Promotion for Creatives (online) starts in August

Both Entrepreneurship for Creatives and Business Start-up for Creatives will take place in July at Granary Square, with further dates throughout the year 

Follow Alison Branagan on Twitter 

CSM Short Courses Easter School!

Students travel from all over the world to study Short Courses at Central Saint Martins. We meet students who are changing career, preparing for a degree, beginners, enthusiasts, experimenters, and everyone in between. We spoke to some of our Easter School students about their Short Courses and why they chose to study with us

Helene Rosas - Fashion Design and Marketing ©Jet
Helene Rosas – Fashion Design and Marketing ©Jet

What’s your name and where do you come from?

My name is Helene and I live in France.

You’ve been studying Fashion Design and Marketing this week, why did you choose this course?

I am looking for a job in Fashion Design but, for me, it is important for a fashion designer to know how to build a brand and know the marketing process that comes with it. I feel it is important to know how this world works. My course has been taught by Erica Charles who is very experienced and really knows what she is talking about. Erica was really stunning, and we can all tell how passionate she is. She has taught me that even though some brands are not huge, there is a world behind it that was not obvious first. London has been an inspiration as well! The people, the museums, the streets…London has a very important cultural influence around the world. Everyone knows it, but you can feel it when you are here.

Sarah Beka - Jewellery Making for Beginners ©Jet
Sarah Beka – Jewellery Making for Beginners ©Jet

What’s your name and where do you come from?

Sarah, I’m Belgian and I live in London, UK.

You have studied Jewellery Making for Beginners this week. Why did you pick this course?

I’ve always wanted to learn about making jewellery and how to work with metals. The techniques I have learnt and the professionalism of the tutor have been the best thing about the course. As I am a beginner at making jewellery, I feel I’ve learnt everything I need to know to start making on my own! The tutor, Anastasia Young, has been great. She gives clear explanations and is always ready to give help and advice. Anastasia has lots of experience in Jewellery. This was a great course to develop my potential, and I would like to come back for more courses!

Ingrid Monti - Fashion Design and Marketing ©Jet
Ingrid Monti – Fashion Design and Marketing ©Jet

What’s your name and where do you come from?

My name is Ingrid and I am from Paris, France.

You have studied Fashion Design and Marketing this week. Why did you pick this course?

 I chose this course for two reasons. The first is Erica Charles, the tutor. I read her profile and I was really impressed by her career and thought that she would have a lot to teach me (and I was right!). The second is that my previous career was only related to product and I felt marketing was something I needed to fill the gap.  When I arrived on the Monday morning, the sky was grey and the fountains outside the building were making steam. It really added some drama to arriving at CSM. Inside, I was thinking “Wow! I am studying at Central Saint Martins!” I feel like I am in the right place. Central Saint Martins and London has a different spirit to anywhere else: everything is cooler, less formal. The city has some amazing architecture but it is the people and their style that I like to observe.

Ingrid runs her own accessories brand Sainte Isaure which you can follow on Instagram and like on Facebook 

Costantina Boubouka - Fashion and Textile Forecasting ©Jake Longley
Costantina Boubouka – Fashion and Textile Forecasting ©Jake Longley

What’s your name and where do you come from?

I am Constantina and I am Greek/Italian, but live in London, UK.

Why did you pick Fashion and Textile Forecasting for your studies?

I chose this course to get a better understanding of the industry and to find out what areas to focus on as a Trend Consultant. The variety of the subjects on the course have been amazing and it has been great to learn about the different areas people in the industry look to for inspiration. Our tutor, Bridget Miles, is a very knowledgeable tutor. She is very patient and open to discussions with her class. London is such an inspiring city to be in. It is a multicultural hub that is perfect for someone who wants to start their own business or kick start their career. The city surprises me every day with the new shops, galleries, and restaurants. They say that if you get tired of London, then you’re tired of life!

Chloe Mercer - Set Design for Film & Television ©Jake Longley
Chloe Mercer – Set Design for Film & Television ©Jake Longley

What’s your name and where do you come from?

I am Chloe and I am from York, UK.

You have studied Set Design for Film and Television. Why did you pick this course?

I wanted to build upon the Fine Art degree I have as well as aid my development. The course is helping me prepare for a new job that I am moving into. The class size is small so one to one contact with the tutor, Clara Zita, really helps you to understand and feel confident in your ideas and progress. The course covers 3D model making which I have not had much experience in before. I now feel confident in the process and method! It’s been nice to be taught by a tutor who currently works in the industry so they can offer first-hand experience and knowledge. I have not been able to get out to see much of London and the exhibitions as I’ve been staying behind after class to use the facilities Central Saint Martins has.

Inhara Ortiz Toledo - Fabrics and Fibres ©Jake Longley
Inhara Ortiz Toledo – Fabrics and Fibres ©Jake Longley

What’s your name and where do you come from?

My name is Inhara, I am Mexican and I live in London, UK.

Which course have you studied with us this week?

I have studied Fabrics and Fibres, taught by Veronica Shattuck. I picked this course because I would like to get involved with the sustainable fashion industry. Learning where and how fabrics are made is very important and interesting to me. Meeting new people from around the world has been great and, as part of the course, I learnt how to make fabric from a fibre! Veronica, our tutor, is very good and knows so much about the topic, she has so much experience. I’ve loved studying at Central Saint Martins, it’s so relaxed and inspirational. You can follow my work here: @Obope

Marta Botas Perez - Fashion and Textile Forecasting ©Jake Longley
Marta Botas Perez – Fashion and Textile Forecasting ©Jake Longley

What’s your name and where do you come from?

I’m Marta and I am from Spain.

Why did you pick Fashion and Textile Forecasting for your studies?

I chose this course as I would like to work in the fashion business as a buyer. The course allows you the freedom to express total creativity in your works, to share them with your mates, as well as meet and learn from new people from different cultures. I felt very happy and comfortable at Central Saint Martins. I think it is a very good opportunity to develop your artistic talent and other creative people. I would really like to come back to study more short courses and maybe a Master’s degree. My experience of CSM and London has been amazing.

Our Easter School is fast approaching, please check our the Short Course website for all available courses and dates.

INSIDE LOOK: Expressive Painting

Ewa Gargulinska is the tutor of Expressive Painting and Imagination in Painting at Central Saint Martins Short Courses.  She is an internationally recognised Polish artist and the author of Poems. Her private collectors include Arthur Sackler (founder of the new wings to the Royal Academy in London and Metropolitan Museum in New York), Jeremy Irons and Vernon Ellis, chairman of the English National Opera.  We chat to Ewa about her Expressive Painting Short Course, her advice for aspiring artists and mindfulness.

Who are your courses targeted to and what should students expect to leave with by the end of their course?

I don’t target my courses to anyone in particular, everyone who is drawn to their title and description can attend. Very often it attracts art therapists and doctors, alongside young people who want to study art or those who want to know how to awaken and to express their imagination.

On completion of the course students will be able to recognise their potential as creators, sustain their concentration, trust their vision, express confidently their imagination through technique; form, colour and to understand the power of the creative mind.

How did you become a painter and what is your advice for anyone wanting to become an artist?

I think it was some deliverance of fortune, I had no choice, I just knew that I had to become an artist.  It may have been prompted by my hyper sensitivity and perception of the world around me and the part I play in it.  I don’t think artists plan to be artists, they simply are. It is an inner call.

My advice to anyone wanting to be an artist would be to listen to your inner voice. Observe and look at everything mindfully, engage in life and the world around you.  Becoming an artist is a lifetime disciplined commitment.

Where do you get your inspiration from and how do you stay inspired?

I feel inspired by human courage to endure suffering. By beauty and power of Nature.  I feel encouraged and empowered by studying the work of good artists; not only those who explore similar emotional themes as my own, but others too who express unexpected imagination through  their vision and skill, as well as an understanding of life and people.  To sustain inspiration I read a lot; philosophy, poetry, literature, going to exhibitions, film, experimental theatre, listen to music, observe my mind as well as others and Nature

The next Expressive Painting course starts on 18 July 2016 with further dates throughout the year

Imagination in Painting starts on 12 December 2016

Guest Blog: Giulio Mazzarini on the art of Food Photography

Giulio Mazzarini is an Italian creative director and photographer, with a masters degree in Design Studies from Central Saint Martins, UAL. Based in London since 1998 and teaching the popular Reportage Photography short course at CSM since 2009, he is launching our first ever Food Photography short course this coming August.

You may be wondering why we need Food Photography?  Well, we invited Giulio to give us an introduction to this brand new course.

My first experience with food photography dates back to the early 90s, when I helped the London-based American photographer Jay Myrdal. I was in my 20s, with sideburns, a black goatee and hair on my head.

Jay’s large Paddington studio was a maze, and that day it had been filled with colourful dishes prepared by a professional home economist.

At the time, food photography was pretty different from what we see today: studio setting could take a long time and it wasn’t possible for food to look fresh for hours. The dishes would therefore be covered with oil, deodorant and/or hair spray to keep them looking shiny and enticing.

You could not be a true professional photographer if you weren’t technically very competent – not only in photography, but also in other fields, such as studio setting and model making. Jay and his first assistant Dani where not only excellent photographers, but also amazing model makers…real craftsmen! And I would observe them in action and eagerly try to learn their tricks.

Photography-wise, images had to have a pretty long depth of field – everything in the image had to be in focus. So we would use wide lenses, with narrow apertures.

And, as we were shooting with a 5×4 Sinar camera and slide film plates, this wasn’t that easy. Exposure had to be exact too. With slide film, errors bigger than half stop could cost the job. As a second assistant, I would run from the studio to the in-house darkroom to pass exposed film to the first assistant, who would unload it and load new film. It was a very delicate process and you couldn’t make any mistakes.

I also remember practising with the light meter, going around the studio with the big Minolta around my neck. I would also help setting the lights.

At the end of my experience as a photographer’s assistant, I was able to shoot film and get the exposure right – often without the need of that light-meter.

So what is left of the legacy of that time, given that we’re now in an era when most food photography is created by bloggers using pocket cameras and smartphones?

Quite a lot, actually. First, the importance of composition: a good food image must be well composed – and studio setting can play a pivotal part in this.

Second, the careful use of light: every stunning image requires stunning light.

Finally, a keen eye for detail. It remains the only indispensable instrument for producing great shots. Rushed work is, most of the time bad work.

By the time I became a professional photographer, I had evolved my style, and become naturally attracted to lifestyle photography, using wide apertures and saturated colours.

Food photography has become a part of my travel and reportage work for magazines and brands, and not by chance, as I have always loved to document cultures, people, nature and the senses.

And in good food photography, all senses work fully. There’s our sight – the initial visual attraction; the smell, when our mouths start watering; the sound, when we touch a plate with the cutlery. And then, of course, there’s the taste. We put the food in our mouth, close our eyes and (hopefully!) are in heaven.

After all, isn’t food photography, like all photography, about “putting on the same line of sight the head, the eye and the heart”? *

*Henry Cartier Bresson.

Giulio Mazzarini

Giulio’s Food Photography course will take place at CSM Granary Square from 17/07/2017 – 21/07/2017.

Guest Blog, Elise Valmorbida: The first creative writing course at CSM Short Courses…

When I proposed ‘Fact or Fiction’ to Central Saint Martins in 1997, the response was “we’re better known for our visual side, but let’s offer it and see what happens”. My first course was sold out, and nearly all my courses since then have been too. Lucky me! I love teaching and I truly believe that in order to be a good teacher I must be a good student. I’ve learned so much from my students, and from the challenge of answering their unpredictable questions. In the process of finding answers, I explore, articulate, and discover.

In those early days, only some students had online addresses, few universities offered degrees in creative writing, and publishers were often unwilling to receive typescript submissions by email—agent or no agent. So much has changed since then. Digital communication has flourished. The traditional book business is in a state of constant disruption. More and more corporations like to talk about ‘storytelling’. More and more individuals want to share their personal stories through social media and self-publishing. You can’t go for a walk without stubbing your toe on a writing masterclass, academy or retreat. The creative writing industry is booming. Just when people generally want to read… less.

Why should anyone read your story? Is it enough to have had a miserable childhood or an unusual ancestor / experience / hairdo? What about the craft? Is it about writing, or is it about being published?

Or is it about your very being? For me, an impulse turned into a compulsion turned into a long slow existential revelation. How many books did it take? How many rejections, deals, launches, retreats, agents, publishers, readers, critics, students…? How much research, thinking, observing, dreaming, writing, editing (and editing, and editing)? I can’t say this simply enough: creative writing is profoundly good for you.

Elise Valmorbida is the author of novels Matilde Waltzing, The TV President and The Winding Stick. Her non-fiction work, The Book of Happy Endings, has been published in four languages: English, German, Korean and Serbian. Her short stories have been published internationally. Elise won the Trailblazer Award (Edinburgh International Film Festival) for her role as producer and script consultant of indie Britfilm SAXON. She wrote ‘The Making of a Guerrilla Film’ story which was published with SAXON the screenplay. She teaches creative writing at Central Saint Martins and Arvon. She is currently writing a non-fiction creative writing guide, and an Italian historical novel.

EliseValmorbida
EliseValmorbida

The next Creative Writing Fact or Fiction – Beginners course starts on the 3 May 2017 and the Creative Writing Fact or Fiction – Intensive starts on the 4 May 2017.

Follow Elise Valmorbida on Facebook

 

The Book of Happy Endings by Elise Valmorbida
The Book of Happy Endings by Elise Valmorbida

 

The Letterpress Trend

In recent years there has been a resurgence in hands-on graphic design techniques with designers using old craft techniques in new and exciting ways; the latest trend is letterpress!

The Letterpress Workshop in Central Saint Martins Kings Cross building is equipped for hand composition and letterpress printing; it includes two proof presses, platen presses and approximately 120 cases of metal type. You can see some of the students from our Graphic Design Portfolio Course exploring the workshop on the course  instagram

Graphic Design Portfolio students exploring the CSM Letterpress Workshop
Graphic Design Portfolio students exploring the CSM Letterpress Workshop

Letterpress is 600-year old technique for relief printing using a printing press. Its invention by Johannes Gutenberg in the mid-15th century and revolutionised the way books were made and led to an exponential increase in the production and availability of books. Before letterpress all books were hand-made and hand written, rare early books are available to be viewed for research purposes at the CSM Museum and Study Collection and at the British Library

Some of the most exciting new work with letterpress combines digital and analogue practices, producing block prints and type from digital artwork, or in the case of 2013 BA Graphic Design Graduate Soo Kyung Kim, designing an entirely new typeface (called Locho Sans),  using a 3D laser cutter to create the printing blocks and then printing with them in the Letterpress Workshop.

Locho Sans by Soo Kyung Kim
Locho Sans by Soo Kyung Kim

Inspired? The full-time Graphic Design Portfolio Course can help you take your design skills to the next level and create a portfolio for application to BA, MA or Professional Practice. There are still spaces for the term starting in April, details of how to apply can be found on our website. You can take this term as a stand-alone 10-week course or as the first stage of a one-year course.

If you are not ready for a full–time course we also run many Short Courses in graphic design including Letterpress and Typography

Laser Cutting the Edge of Textile Design

In her new book, Laser Cutting for Fashion and Textiles, Central Saint Martins tutor Laura Baker describes how the combination of new digital technologies and traditional craftsmanship are putting laser cutting at the cutting edge of Textile Design. The book contains instructions for 14 original designs that you can try at home to develop your skills in Laser Cutting.

Laser Cutting has become more readily available through small-scale bureau and you can create designs using vector-based software on your computer at home. All of the designs in Laser Cutting for Fashion And Textiles use Adobe Illustrator but you can also use SketchUp, Rhino, AutoCAD and other vector-based software to make your own designs.

Shawl - Silk crepe de chine and laser cut wood veneer
Shawl – Silk crepe de chine and laser cut wood veneer

Laser cutting machines create a concentrated beam of light that is capable of cutting through an amazing amount of different materials including (but not limited to) fabric, glass, plastic, ceramics and wood. You can use laser cutting to cut areas out of your material or to mark the surface in different ways and on different scales depending on your creative idea. This process is not limited to Textile Design and these ideas and processes can be applied to all areas of art and design.

Stacked Polygon Bangles
Stacked Polygon Bangles

Laura Baker is one of the Course Directors of our Textiles Portfolio, a course designed to help you develop a portfolio for application for further study or professional practice. She is specialist technician in digital textiles for Central Saint Martins and teaches on BA Textile Design and MA Materials Futures as well as running short courses in Laser Cutting for Textile Design and Digital Print on Textiles and Digital Print on Textiles

Some of Laura’s designs are currently on display in Real Dirty Blue, an exhibition about the playful and innovative approaches taken to Textile Design at CSM. The exhibition is on at the Lethaby Gallery, Central Saint Martins until 1 April 2016.

 

Student Review: Total Drawing

Angelica Salvia is a recent graduate of our Total Drawing course, taught by Ilga Leimanis.  We had a chat to Angelica about her experience on the course and how it has benefitted her career and personal development

Why did you choose to study Total Drawing?

I chose the Total Drawing course because I needed to regain a physical approach to creativity which I feel I had lost over the years through the increasing usage of technological devices in my profession.  Also, as a designer, I personally find it fundamental to stay challenged, strengthening my mental flexibility and forcing me to adapt to a different point of view.

What 3 words describe your short course experience at Central Saint Martins?

Solid, for its structure. The first part of the class was always very intense and focused on technique. The afternoon was dedicated to a looser approach to the visual representation and was more emotionally engaging.

Intimate, because of the limited number of people admitted to the class which allowed us to fully engage and concentrate.  The presence of like-minded people enjoying the moment and our encouraging tutor, created a positive creative energy in the classroom.

Flexible, for the variety of subjects drawn, the use of outdoor venues, and the freedom of expression gained once we were given basic technical directions.

Angelica Salvia
Angelica Salvia

What did you enjoy most about your course?

The Life Drawing sessions were surprisingly overwhelming and challenging. The task of catching the whole essence of a pose in only a few seconds when the model was changing poses very quickly was highly engaging.

How has this course benefited your career or personal development?

By slowly taking control of my drawing skills again, my spatial awareness has become more powerful.  Through drawing I have developed a more fluid hand, which allows me to design a more spontaneous and vivid imprint of my spatial visions.

What would you say to someone who is thinking about taking this course?

Whatever your ability, this course will be the occasion to learn new skills or refresh existing skills and perspectives. You may also find that a particular exercise actually triggers something you can adapt and use in your profession. I would suggest approaching it with an open mind as you might be really surprised with what you are able to achieve at the end of the day. Ultimately just enjoy the process and trust your intuition!

The next Total Drawing Course starts on 11 April 2016 with further dates throughout the year

The course is also taught online with the next course starting on 28 April 2016

Ilga Leimanis also teaches:

Drawing Portfolio – Daytime

Portfolio Sketchbook

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