Central Saint Martins Foundation Show

The annual Foundation Show opens this week! The exhibition showcases work from students across the five curriculum areas: 3-Dimensional Design and Architecture | Fashion and Textiles | Fine Art | Graphic and Communication Design | Performance Design and Practice

Opening times:
Thursday to Friday: 12 noon – 8pm
Saturday: 12 noon – 6pm

This event is free and open to the public, no booking is required.

And it all began with a weekend Short Course….

We love this article in Love My Dress about Jewellery Designer Nikki Stark, a former Short Course Jewellery Making student at Central Saint Martins.

“I took at Saturday course at Central St Martins just over 10 years ago and since then haven’t looked back. I was instantly hooked.”

Head over to www.lovemydress.net for the full article and Jewellery Making inspiration!

 

 

Part Of Us: Auction & Exhibition today at CSM!

Today Central Saint Martins opens its doors to the public for a ‘Displaced Artist’s’ exhibition and auction with all proceeds going to Charities in Calais and Europe helping refugees with therapeutic and legal aid.

Organised by the student led initiative Part of Us, student, staff and alumni will be showcased and auctioned alongside donated pledges.

Exhibition opens at 5pm, talks from our partner charities from 6pm, with the live & silent auction from 7pm

Open to all UAL students and the public, this is a unique chance to walk away with artwork such as David Shillinglaw’s Kapow.  In addition to the selected artworks, a series of pledges have been donated ranging from luxury beach-side escapes – including 34-foot sailing yacht in Valencia, to an Art Deco style boat in the beautiful Discovery Bay Marina, Lantau Island, Hong Kong – award winning jewellery, cocktail and dance classes. Also up for auction is a complete tour of Central Saint Martins’ Head of College, Jeremy Till’s eco straw bale house.

Full details of the auction and exhibition can be found on the UAL website

Booking required RSVP via Eventbrite

Easter School Instagram Competition Winner

During our Easter School we ran an Instagram competition for our Short Course students with the lucky winner walking away with a £50 Amazon voucher.  We are happy to announce the winner as Mimi Ziv who instagrammed her experience of Experimental Fashion Drawing, taught by Alexis Panayiotou.  Mimi’s snap showcased what happens in the Fashion Drawing classroom, including drawing from a model and her own work. Studying a Short Course with us?  Share your experience! #MyCSM

MA Fashion Graduates new exhibition ‘Separates’

Summer Term starts at Central Saint Martins Short Courses next week and coinciding with this is an amazing new exhibition at our Lethaby Gallery.

Specially selected ‘separates’ from the collections of CSM’s 2016 MA Fashion graduates following the show at London Fashion Week in February will be on display until the 27 April.

Following its launch last year, this annual unveiling returns to give visitors an introduction to the work of designers from a course with an outstanding international reputation.

Separates‘ is on show at the Lethaby Gallery, 1 Granary Square, until 27 April

Opening hours: Tuesday to Friday 11am to 6pm

Saturday 12noon – 5pm 

Meet Our Tutors Series: Schelay McCarter

Schelay McCarter is an Associate Lecturer at the University of the Arts London, a freelance designer/Art Director and has been teaching Art Direction for Fashion at CSM Short Courses since 1997.  Her expertise lies in commercial fashion branding and this includes fashion forecasting, journalism and creative project management. We spoke to Schelay about how she got into Art Direction, her advice for inspiring creatives and her passion for teaching.

What inspired you become an Art Director in fashion?

When I think about what inspired me to become an art director my early childhood comes to mind. I had a fashion savvy mother who would think nothing of running up copious amounts of summer dresses in pretty patterned cotton prints for us each season as we grew up. I have memories of my sisters and I being photographed by my father wearing fake sheep skin fur coats, made by my mother, beautifully lined, we looked like cute little lambs in them! My mother’s sewing machine was always out – she taught me to sew, I made Barbie doll clothes, tacked them onto card and photographed them ready to sell. I sold them in a local shop in Blackheath village. This opened my eyes to the potential and immediacy of style and fashion, creating an image and selling an idea. Vogue magazine was an influence, the fashion photography in particular fascinated me, the model, lighting, pose, hair and make-up, styling and location that transported me to a bewitching world of seemingly effortless glamour. It became a world that I wanted in some way to be part of.

Schelay who learned to sew at a tender age!
Schelay who learned to sew at a tender age!

Tell us about your work

My work is about creating a tailor made brand image formula that reflects my client’s product market position and the aspiration of the target customer for all media applications be a website or for in store visual merchandising or both.

My work is varied.  My previous experience as senior art director and graphic designer for M&S allowed me the freedom to set my fashion narratives in a variety of large country houses, studios or cityscapes.  My vision is to make the viewer feel both voyeur as well as part of the scene depicted. I have used some exceptional locations and photographers; two photo shoots that stand out amongst many are Cliveden House with Simon Bottomly shooting a luxury lingerie collection in the Lady Astor suite and Antebellum House in South Carolina with Jean Pierre Masclet shooting all store M&S season’s ranges.  At a recent fashion brand production shoot for a Chilean client called Saville Row. I had a 19 strong team with photographer Sam Robinson on location at Wrotham Park in Hertfordshire. This location has been used for Downton Abbey as well as the film Gosford park.  It was a surreal moment when my team and I had lunch in the Downton Abbey Kitchen!  It is my creative team I have to thank for my fashion production successes.

shooting at Wrotham Park
shooting at Wrotham Park

What are you most passionate about?

My professional practice is very important to me, however it is my teaching that I am most passionate about. I encourage innovation and proactive practices, thinking outside the box is fostered on my art direction and production work as well as from my students on my art direction for fashion courses.

We are living in one of the most exciting periods of modern history where through advances in internet application there has been an opening up of opportunity.  Utilising the past and present with the new exiting technologies available through new media, photography and post-production there has never been a better time for being an image maker.

student work in progress - bringing ideas together
student work in progress – bringing ideas together

Which piece of creative work in any discipline do you most love?

I love the alchemy of photography. Capturing a moment. Whether created on an old box Brownie using film like Jacques Henri Lartigue or Cartier Bresson’s work, I particularly like David Bailey’s brilliant Roliflex film work from the 1960s and 70s. James Meakin and Miles Aldrige’s digital camera work is vibrant and beautiful. I find the process of viewing new images and editing the selection creates the same feeling I get opening up a box of chocolates to choose the best one!

Where is your favourite London Discovery?

My favourite London discovery currently is the myriad of riverside cycle routes by the side of the London canal waterways, there is one next to the Granary road CSM Campus that leads to Little Venice and Paddington.  I often take my fold up bike along this route.

The canal path outside Central Saint Martins, Granary Square
The canal path outside Central Saint Martins, Granary Square

What is your Guilty pleasure?

It has to be dark chocolate ……

Name a favourite book, song or film

‘The Bolter’ by Frances Osbourne.

Dear Prudence by the Beatles

Dear Prudence
Dear Prudence

What advice would you give to aspiring creatives?

Use your initiative; be proactive and positive, a team player doing unto others as you would be done to yourself!

What’s the best bit of advice you have ever been given?

Carpe diem!

The next Art Direction for Fashion course starts on the 19th April 2016 with further dates throughout the year

This course is also taught online with the next course starting on the 28th April 2016

Read a student review of Art Direction for Fashion in a previous blog post here!

Guest Blog: Giulio Mazzarini on the art of Food Photography

Giulio Mazzarini is an Italian creative director and photographer, with a masters degree in Design Studies from Central Saint Martins, UAL. Based in London since 1998 and teaching the popular Reportage Photography short course at CSM since 2009, he is launching our first ever Food Photography short course this coming August.

You may be wondering why we need Food Photography?  Well, we invited Giulio to give us an introduction to this brand new course.

My first experience with food photography dates back to the early 90s, when I helped the London-based American photographer Jay Myrdal. I was in my 20s, with sideburns, a black goatee and hair on my head.

Jay’s large Paddington studio was a maze, and that day it had been filled with colourful dishes prepared by a professional home economist.

At the time, food photography was pretty different from what we see today: studio setting could take a long time and it wasn’t possible for food to look fresh for hours. The dishes would therefore be covered with oil, deodorant and/or hair spray to keep them looking shiny and enticing.

You could not be a true professional photographer if you weren’t technically very competent – not only in photography, but also in other fields, such as studio setting and model making. Jay and his first assistant Dani where not only excellent photographers, but also amazing model makers…real craftsmen! And I would observe them in action and eagerly try to learn their tricks.

Photography-wise, images had to have a pretty long depth of field – everything in the image had to be in focus. So we would use wide lenses, with narrow apertures.

And, as we were shooting with a 5×4 Sinar camera and slide film plates, this wasn’t that easy. Exposure had to be exact too. With slide film, errors bigger than half stop could cost the job. As a second assistant, I would run from the studio to the in-house darkroom to pass exposed film to the first assistant, who would unload it and load new film. It was a very delicate process and you couldn’t make any mistakes.

I also remember practising with the light meter, going around the studio with the big Minolta around my neck. I would also help setting the lights.

At the end of my experience as a photographer’s assistant, I was able to shoot film and get the exposure right – often without the need of that light-meter.

So what is left of the legacy of that time, given that we’re now in an era when most food photography is created by bloggers using pocket cameras and smartphones?

Quite a lot, actually. First, the importance of composition: a good food image must be well composed – and studio setting can play a pivotal part in this.

Second, the careful use of light: every stunning image requires stunning light.

Finally, a keen eye for detail. It remains the only indispensable instrument for producing great shots. Rushed work is, most of the time bad work.

By the time I became a professional photographer, I had evolved my style, and become naturally attracted to lifestyle photography, using wide apertures and saturated colours.

Food photography has become a part of my travel and reportage work for magazines and brands, and not by chance, as I have always loved to document cultures, people, nature and the senses.

And in good food photography, all senses work fully. There’s our sight – the initial visual attraction; the smell, when our mouths start watering; the sound, when we touch a plate with the cutlery. And then, of course, there’s the taste. We put the food in our mouth, close our eyes and (hopefully!) are in heaven.

After all, isn’t food photography, like all photography, about “putting on the same line of sight the head, the eye and the heart”? *

*Henry Cartier Bresson.

Giulio Mazzarini

Giulio’s Food Photography will take place at Granary Square from 1/08/2016 – 05/8/2016

Thinking about taking a Jewellery course?

Thinking about taking a Jewellery course, but don’t know what to expect?  Edvvin Charmain completed three Jewellery Short Courses at Central Saint Martins and compiled a fantastic review over on his blog Edvisored.  Thank you Edvisored, we are thrilled that you enjoyed them!

Our Jewellery courses run throughout the year and the next available dates are:

Jewellery Making for Beginners 29th March

Organic Form in Jewellery 15th August

Jewellery Making with Plastic and Metal  4th July

Please visit the Short Course website for more Jewellery course options and dates

Easter School Instagram Competition #MyCSM

Easter School at Central Saint Martins is now under way and we are inviting all Easter School Short Course students to take part in our Instagram competition.

Tag your Instagram photos with #MyCSM during your Easter School course, between 21 March and 15 April 2016 for a chance to win a £50 Amazon Voucher!!

For some inspiration check out #MyCSM

Guest Blog, Elise Valmorbida: The first creative writing course at CSM Short Courses…

When I proposed ‘Fact or Fiction’ to Central Saint Martins in 1997, the response was “we’re better known for our visual side, but let’s offer it and see what happens”. My first course was sold out, and nearly all my courses since then have been too. Lucky me! I love teaching and I truly believe that in order to be a good teacher I must be a good student. I’ve learned so much from my students, and from the challenge of answering their unpredictable questions. In the process of finding answers, I explore, articulate, and discover.

In those early days, only some students had online addresses, few universities offered degrees in creative writing, and publishers were often unwilling to receive typescript submissions by email—agent or no agent. So much has changed since then. Digital communication has flourished. The traditional book business is in a state of constant disruption. More and more corporations like to talk about ‘storytelling’. More and more individuals want to share their personal stories through social media and self-publishing. You can’t go for a walk without stubbing your toe on a writing masterclass, academy or retreat. The creative writing industry is booming. Just when people generally want to read… less.

Why should anyone read your story? Is it enough to have had a miserable childhood or an unusual ancestor / experience / hairdo? What about the craft? Is it about writing, or is it about being published?

Or is it about your very being? For me, an impulse turned into a compulsion turned into a long slow existential revelation. How many books did it take? How many rejections, deals, launches, retreats, agents, publishers, readers, critics, students…? How much research, thinking, observing, dreaming, writing, editing (and editing, and editing)? I can’t say this simply enough: creative writing is profoundly good for you.

Elise Valmorbida is the author of novels Matilde Waltzing, The TV President and The Winding Stick. Her non-fiction work, The Book of Happy Endings, has been published in four languages: English, German, Korean and Serbian. Her short stories have been published internationally. Elise won the Trailblazer Award (Edinburgh International Film Festival) for her role as producer and script consultant of indie Britfilm SAXON. She wrote ‘The Making of a Guerrilla Film’ story which was published with SAXON the screenplay. She teaches creative writing at Central Saint Martins and Arvon. She is currently writing a non-fiction creative writing guide, and an Italian historical novel.

EliseValmorbida
EliseValmorbida

The next Creative Writing Fact or Fiction – Beginners course starts on the 20th April 2016 and the Creative Writing Fact or Fiction – Intensive starts on the 21st April 2016

Follow Elise Valmorbida on Facebook

 

The Book of Happy Endings by Elise Valmorbida
The Book of Happy Endings by Elise Valmorbida

 

Short Courses at Central Saint Martins

Skip to toolbar